Upcoming Project: The Adventures of Tintin: Prisoners of the Sun (2016)

From comingsoon.net

Thrilling and wildly funny, the “Tintin” stories chronicle the escapades of a junior reporter who has a nose for a good story and a talent for attracting trouble, which more often than not imperils his life!

In the original Hergé comics, “Prisoners of the Sun” is the second book of a two-part story that follows “The Seven Crystal Balls.” It is almost certain that the script will include both parts, retaining the title of the latter. (Much like the first film, which adapts both Hergé’s “The Secret of the Unicorn” and “Red Rackham’s Treasure,” using the title of the former).

“The Seven Crystal Balls” was originally published in 1943 as a serialized newspaper adventure. The storyline has Tintin and his friends embarking on an adventure to Peru after a mysterious illness is found to be connected with a Mummy’s curse.

Upcoming Project: Terminator Reboot TV Series & Film
Ugh.
Look — I love this world. I love Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgment Day. But I don’t want to go back to this world.
My heavy remake fatigue doesn’t stem as much from the worlds themselves. As ideas, killer robots and time travel are just always going to be interesting. But modern science fiction, as this article points out, has problems.
As I reflected today on the content of a film, I realized the question I always ask is: what are you saying? The response I have to a film is always in direct reaction to that question. The only reason I enjoyed the television show Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles is that it dealt with time, love, cognition, life and death. It respected the world of the two great films — and it had something to say.
The films we remember, the reason to even bother rebooting in the first place, is because the original filmmakers had something to say — something that became memorable, powerful, and influential. Sci-fi that changed the world.
You’ll pardon me if I don’t want to go back but today’s remakes have nothing to say. If they did, they’d say it in their own worlds.

Upcoming Project: Terminator Reboot TV Series & Film

Ugh.

Look — I love this world. I love Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgment Day. But I don’t want to go back to this world.

My heavy remake fatigue doesn’t stem as much from the worlds themselves. As ideas, killer robots and time travel are just always going to be interesting. But modern science fiction, as this article points out, has problems.

As I reflected today on the content of a film, I realized the question I always ask is: what are you saying? The response I have to a film is always in direct reaction to that question. The only reason I enjoyed the television show Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles is that it dealt with time, love, cognition, life and death. It respected the world of the two great films — and it had something to say.

The films we remember, the reason to even bother rebooting in the first place, is because the original filmmakers had something to say — something that became memorable, powerful, and influential. Sci-fi that changed the world.

You’ll pardon me if I don’t want to go back but today’s remakes have nothing to say. If they did, they’d say it in their own worlds.