When Defending a Movie Becomes Intellectual Genocide or Why Hating on Haters Makes You a Hater
 By Robert Fure

Here’s a question: when we did we stop being fans of movies and become defenders of them? Follow up: when did it become a punishable offense not to enjoy things the same way others do? Sub question: since when is not liking a film as much as someone else the same as hating it?
I’m assuming that since movies have existed, people have enjoyed talking about them. Shortly after the awe and wonder faded, they probably also enjoyed (or at least engaged in) debating over their particular merits. You know, once there started being more than one released every few months.
Here’s a troubling trend I’m noticing: movie critics now consider themselves defenders of films, rather than critics or writers. With the rapid spread of information (and random words) through things like Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, it has become increasingly difficult to even properly identify someone as a critic. What makes a critic? If you publicly reveal your opinion to the masses on the internet, is it not a topic for conversation? Is it not then welcomed for people to engage in debate? Doesn’t that make you a critic?
If you didn’t want people to comment on your comment, shouldn’t you have kept it to yourself?
There are two very recent movies that come to mind when thinking about the defensive nature people have taken on about movies. It is no longer “to each their own,” apparently, but now “fuck you if you don’t like what I do.”
…Rather than the hangman’s noose, now dissenters are faced with court of very public appeals, where not liking a movie means you’re a moron. Maybe I’ve discovered why everyone is always so positive about movies now? Why everything is the greatest and not just average? Wouldn’t want someone on Twitter calling you an idiot.
…Doesn’t personal opinion depend on the person? You can’t actually be wrong about something subjective. Your own personal opinion can’t be wrong. Sure, you can be wrong about plot points or specifics if maybe you missed something or you really, honestly, actually didn’t get it. You can be wrong about what you thought happened (sometimes), but you can’t be wrong about how it made you feel.

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When Defending a Movie Becomes Intellectual Genocide or Why Hating on Haters Makes You a Hater

 By Robert Fure

Here’s a question: when we did we stop being fans of movies and become defenders of them? Follow up: when did it become a punishable offense not to enjoy things the same way others do? Sub question: since when is not liking a film as much as someone else the same as hating it?

I’m assuming that since movies have existed, people have enjoyed talking about them. Shortly after the awe and wonder faded, they probably also enjoyed (or at least engaged in) debating over their particular merits. You know, once there started being more than one released every few months.

Here’s a troubling trend I’m noticing: movie critics now consider themselves defenders of films, rather than critics or writers. With the rapid spread of information (and random words) through things like Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, it has become increasingly difficult to even properly identify someone as a critic. What makes a critic? If you publicly reveal your opinion to the masses on the internet, is it not a topic for conversation? Is it not then welcomed for people to engage in debate? Doesn’t that make you a critic?

If you didn’t want people to comment on your comment, shouldn’t you have kept it to yourself?

There are two very recent movies that come to mind when thinking about the defensive nature people have taken on about movies. It is no longer “to each their own,” apparently, but now “fuck you if you don’t like what I do.”

…Rather than the hangman’s noose, now dissenters are faced with court of very public appeals, where not liking a movie means you’re a moron. Maybe I’ve discovered why everyone is always so positive about movies now? Why everything is the greatest and not just average? Wouldn’t want someone on Twitter calling you an idiot.

…Doesn’t personal opinion depend on the person? You can’t actually be wrong about something subjective. Your own personal opinion can’t be wrong. Sure, you can be wrong about plot points or specifics if maybe you missed something or you really, honestly, actually didn’t get it. You can be wrong about what you thought happened (sometimes), but you can’t be wrong about how it made you feel.

Read the whole article