The Gentleman’s Guide to Hating or Why Calling Criticism Sexist or Racist Makes You Worse than Hitler 
By Robert Fure

…So there’s the thing about Girls for me. The main reason I didn’t like the pilot was because I found the characters to be annoying bitches. Does that make me sexist? Because that’s the second half of this rant.
It seems that anything negative about the show is dismissed as sexism. This comes up a lot when talking about anyone or anything that can be considered a minority. Now, women aren’t minorities, but women in powerful positions in Hollywood, namely writing/directing/producing, are. Various races, in America and Hollywood, are obviously minorities. Sometimes, I hate the movies black directors make. Sometimes I hate the movies women write. That does not make me racist or sexist, despite that being the most convenient argument for someone to jump on.
It is not sexist to hate Girls. In fact, I might argue that it is more sexist to unnaturally defend Girls than it is to attack it. Why are so many people jumping to the defense of this show? I say it’s fine to hate Dunham’s work based on Tiny Furniture and the pilot of Girls. Are some pilots bad? Sure. Will Girls get better? Maybe. But I can hate it now. I might hate it less later, but I can totally hate it now.
Where is this wall of defense to protect men? When The River, from Oren Peli, hit the airwaves, everyone derided it as shit. Shouldn’t we give him a bigger shot? Doesn’t he deserve a few more chances? I mean, if it’s too early to judge Dunham, isn’t it too early to judge anyone who has only “made it” by getting a pilot on the biggest cable station in the world and having a movie get a Criterion Collection release?
SARCASM ALERT. It is not too early to hate Dunham, and it is not sexist to do so. What does a sexist comment look like? I suppose it would be more like “Man, Lena Dunham is a stupid bitch! She should be in the kitchen where all women belong!” That’s definitely sexist.
But saying “Dunham is an annoying bitch! Why does she have a show?” is the exact same thing as saying “Michael Bay is a fucking dick! Why does he make movies?”
You would never accuse the person who said the latter of hating men, would you? Quick, what is the word that means someone hates men? Misandry is the hatred of men, while a misandrist hates men. Misanthropy, for reference, is the hatred of mankind. And in a truly revealing bit of sexism, my browser is telling me “misandry” isn’t even a word. PIG.
I feel like this is part of a far larger issue that I can’t cover here, which would broach why men in TV commercials are shown to be idiots while men in sit-coms are often simpletons. As writer Warren Farrell said: “In the past quarter century, we exposed biases against other races and called it racism, and we exposed biases against women and called it sexism. Biases against men we call humor.”

[image by sad disco]

The Gentleman’s Guide to Hating or Why Calling Criticism Sexist or Racist Makes You Worse than Hitler

By Robert Fure

…So there’s the thing about Girls for me. The main reason I didn’t like the pilot was because I found the characters to be annoying bitches. Does that make me sexist? Because that’s the second half of this rant.

It seems that anything negative about the show is dismissed as sexism. This comes up a lot when talking about anyone or anything that can be considered a minority. Now, women aren’t minorities, but women in powerful positions in Hollywood, namely writing/directing/producing, are. Various races, in America and Hollywood, are obviously minorities. Sometimes, I hate the movies black directors make. Sometimes I hate the movies women write. That does not make me racist or sexist, despite that being the most convenient argument for someone to jump on.

It is not sexist to hate Girls. In fact, I might argue that it is more sexist to unnaturally defend Girls than it is to attack it. Why are so many people jumping to the defense of this show? I say it’s fine to hate Dunham’s work based on Tiny Furniture and the pilot of Girls. Are some pilots bad? Sure. Will Girls get better? Maybe. But I can hate it now. I might hate it less later, but I can totally hate it now.

Where is this wall of defense to protect men? When The River, from Oren Peli, hit the airwaves, everyone derided it as shit. Shouldn’t we give him a bigger shot? Doesn’t he deserve a few more chances? I mean, if it’s too early to judge Dunham, isn’t it too early to judge anyone who has only “made it” by getting a pilot on the biggest cable station in the world and having a movie get a Criterion Collection release?

SARCASM ALERT. It is not too early to hate Dunham, and it is not sexist to do so. What does a sexist comment look like? I suppose it would be more like “Man, Lena Dunham is a stupid bitch! She should be in the kitchen where all women belong!” That’s definitely sexist.

But saying “Dunham is an annoying bitch! Why does she have a show?” is the exact same thing as saying “Michael Bay is a fucking dick! Why does he make movies?”

You would never accuse the person who said the latter of hating men, would you? Quick, what is the word that means someone hates men? Misandry is the hatred of men, while a misandrist hates men. Misanthropy, for reference, is the hatred of mankind. And in a truly revealing bit of sexism, my browser is telling me “misandry” isn’t even a word. PIG.

I feel like this is part of a far larger issue that I can’t cover here, which would broach why men in TV commercials are shown to be idiots while men in sit-coms are often simpletons. As writer Warren Farrell said: “In the past quarter century, we exposed biases against other races and called it racism, and we exposed biases against women and called it sexism. Biases against men we call humor.”

[image by sad disco]

When Defending a Movie Becomes Intellectual Genocide or Why Hating on Haters Makes You a Hater
 By Robert Fure

Here’s a question: when we did we stop being fans of movies and become defenders of them? Follow up: when did it become a punishable offense not to enjoy things the same way others do? Sub question: since when is not liking a film as much as someone else the same as hating it?
I’m assuming that since movies have existed, people have enjoyed talking about them. Shortly after the awe and wonder faded, they probably also enjoyed (or at least engaged in) debating over their particular merits. You know, once there started being more than one released every few months.
Here’s a troubling trend I’m noticing: movie critics now consider themselves defenders of films, rather than critics or writers. With the rapid spread of information (and random words) through things like Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, it has become increasingly difficult to even properly identify someone as a critic. What makes a critic? If you publicly reveal your opinion to the masses on the internet, is it not a topic for conversation? Is it not then welcomed for people to engage in debate? Doesn’t that make you a critic?
If you didn’t want people to comment on your comment, shouldn’t you have kept it to yourself?
There are two very recent movies that come to mind when thinking about the defensive nature people have taken on about movies. It is no longer “to each their own,” apparently, but now “fuck you if you don’t like what I do.”
…Rather than the hangman’s noose, now dissenters are faced with court of very public appeals, where not liking a movie means you’re a moron. Maybe I’ve discovered why everyone is always so positive about movies now? Why everything is the greatest and not just average? Wouldn’t want someone on Twitter calling you an idiot.
…Doesn’t personal opinion depend on the person? You can’t actually be wrong about something subjective. Your own personal opinion can’t be wrong. Sure, you can be wrong about plot points or specifics if maybe you missed something or you really, honestly, actually didn’t get it. You can be wrong about what you thought happened (sometimes), but you can’t be wrong about how it made you feel.

Read the whole article

When Defending a Movie Becomes Intellectual Genocide or Why Hating on Haters Makes You a Hater

 By Robert Fure

Here’s a question: when we did we stop being fans of movies and become defenders of them? Follow up: when did it become a punishable offense not to enjoy things the same way others do? Sub question: since when is not liking a film as much as someone else the same as hating it?

I’m assuming that since movies have existed, people have enjoyed talking about them. Shortly after the awe and wonder faded, they probably also enjoyed (or at least engaged in) debating over their particular merits. You know, once there started being more than one released every few months.

Here’s a troubling trend I’m noticing: movie critics now consider themselves defenders of films, rather than critics or writers. With the rapid spread of information (and random words) through things like Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, it has become increasingly difficult to even properly identify someone as a critic. What makes a critic? If you publicly reveal your opinion to the masses on the internet, is it not a topic for conversation? Is it not then welcomed for people to engage in debate? Doesn’t that make you a critic?

If you didn’t want people to comment on your comment, shouldn’t you have kept it to yourself?

There are two very recent movies that come to mind when thinking about the defensive nature people have taken on about movies. It is no longer “to each their own,” apparently, but now “fuck you if you don’t like what I do.”

…Rather than the hangman’s noose, now dissenters are faced with court of very public appeals, where not liking a movie means you’re a moron. Maybe I’ve discovered why everyone is always so positive about movies now? Why everything is the greatest and not just average? Wouldn’t want someone on Twitter calling you an idiot.

…Doesn’t personal opinion depend on the person? You can’t actually be wrong about something subjective. Your own personal opinion can’t be wrong. Sure, you can be wrong about plot points or specifics if maybe you missed something or you really, honestly, actually didn’t get it. You can be wrong about what you thought happened (sometimes), but you can’t be wrong about how it made you feel.

Read the whole article