rubenfm
cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From… It’s powerful knowledge — straight from the source.
Martin Scorsese
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Billy Wilder
Steven Spielberg
The Coen Brothers
Wes Anderson
Ridley Scott
David Cronenberg
Pixar
Nora Ephron
Aaron Sorkin
Michael Haneke
Christopher Nolan
Jon Jost
John Ford
Charlie Kaufman
Sylvester Stallone
Tony Scott
Frank Darabont
Monty Python
Werner Herzog
Paul Thomas Anderson

Joss Whedon
Rian Johnson
Wes Craven
John Carpenter
Dario Argento
The Wachowskis
Steven Soderbergh
George Lucas
Peter Jackson
Kathryn Bigelow
Quentin Tarantino
Sundance Directors
Harold Lloyd
John McTiernan
Oscar Winning Directors
Ang Lee
Danny Boyle
Harmony Korine
Dennis Hopper
Sam Raimi
Shane Black
Richard Linklater
Alejandro Jodorowsky
Guillermo del Toro
Sam Peckinpah
Akira Kurosawa

Edgar Wright
Wong Kar-Wai
Robert Altman
James Wan
Errol Morris
Ron Howard
Yasujirō Ozu
Kimberly Peirce
Steve McQueen
Andy Warhol
Roger Deakins
David O. Russell
James Gray
Terry Gilliam
Andy Serkis
Rick Baker
Alain Resnais
William Friedkin
Saul Zaentz
Woody Allen’s Manhattan
Abbas Kiarostami
Darren Aronofsky
Lars von Trier
Hayao Miyazaki
Federico Fellini
Sarah Polley
Tommy Wiseau
Brian Koppelman
Spike Lee

cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From… It’s powerful knowledge — straight from the source.

Multi-Tasker Mark Duplass Explains His New Indie Paradigm


by Anne Thompson



What are the projects you’re working on now?
“The One I Love” is coming out August 22nd. “Creep,” which I just finished and sold — also to Radius — we’re going to do a trilogy of those movies. I’m going to make two more towards the end of year. My new show  “Togetherness” will come out on HBO in January. This is the time when you start submitting your movies to Toronto and Sundance, so I have five others that I’m producing and working on, and I have two television shows I’m making independently. I’m very interested in taking the model of independent film directly into television, which it’s time for. Rather than just go out and say, “Hey, here’s my script and pilot,” and then they just cancel you — because that’s what they do — I’m trying to cut through all that and just say, “Here is a season of a television show. If you like it, you have to buy this and buy one more.” So I can guarantee being on the air.
So you’ll pay for that in advance, then shoot it. Wow. Netflix might give you the money?
Yeah. They might, but…I know it sounds crazy, but I’d rather gamble on myself. The money I have to make by owning myself and the control I have over the content is worthwhile to me, rather than getting an upfront price tag, having our salaries be low, and we feel like we should be grateful because… I don’t want to do that any more.
Is “Jeff, Who Lives at Home” an example of where you felt slightly compromised on what you ended up doing?
[Jay and I] did pretty well on “Jeff,” actually, because that was independently financed by Steve Rales, who runs Indian Paintbrush. But [on others] there was a bit of a battle. Ultimately, I’ve almost gotten to make what I want to make; it’s just a question of how much yelling you have to do to get there, and an unfortunate reality of this town is they often don’t think you’re passionate unless you’re screaming. I like to be a sensitive person. I’ve been to therapy; I know that you need to validate people and listen to them, hear them. I’m in a marriage and I know all about this stuff. When you do that in a studio meeting, they think you’re weak and walk all over you. When you yell, it’s “this guy has vision and passion!” Which sucks! But I’ve been put in that position. Sometimes you have to do that.
But you don’t have to do that with Lynn Shelton. Or Colin Trevorrow on “Safety Not Guaranteed,” another example where you collaborated with a young director. Who has gone on to “Jurassic Park”!
I work with really smart first-time directors. I think, “you’re like what I thought when I was 28. You’re full of these ideas, you’re a cool person, and you don’t know how to put yourself on film yet.” The first thing I ask them is, “What was the last conversation you had where you knew you had to go to sleep for work the next day, but you couldn’t go to sleep because you were so excited — you were up with your friends drinking wine? Something in the content of that conversation is what you should be making your movie about.”
It took me ten years to figure that out. When my brother and I would sit on an airplane and watch the crazy people coming on the airplane and tell weird little stories about them — people-watch in our private little sense of humor — that’s where your stuff comes from. I feel like, as a producer, I have something like that to offer: eliciting stuff out of people.
In an ideal world you would be moving up in the movie business, but you’re still working at a micro-budget level. Is there an opportunity for you to grow and make a living?
I’ll be perfectly honest with you: the way I work on a micro-budget makes me more money and makes me more creatively satisfied than if I was doing movies at a 4-to-$7-million level. It sounds crazy, but I now have the connections in the industry so that I can borrow cameras and I can borrow locations. Everybody comes to work for [a small flat rate] per day — whether you’re a PA or a director, whoever you are. It’s all Communism. But you get points, and everybody’s an owner in the movie.
Which movies follow this model?
Quite a few of them. “Creep” is a great example of that; “The One I Love” is a good example of that. “Your Sister’s Sister,” “Baghead,” “Pentathlon” — the list goes on and on. I take money from my TV shows and I do everything. What I do is, I don’t hog 80% of the profits like a studio would, because everybody’s doing the work, so I share a huge chunk of the movie with my cast and crew — anywhere from 50 to 80% of it, depending on how complex it is. We take that movie, we sell it, and I make sure the distributors get a piece of it, because I don’t beat up my distributors. If it’s going to be profitable, you owe me some of that. When you break down the finances… when you go from a $5 million movie, you make $30,000, maybe, and you get no points. But when I make these little movies and we sell them, people walk away with windfalls. You’d be surprised.
Something like “Black Rock” was a movie that we made for [a tiny budget and sold for much more than that]; I shared that with all my cast and crew; Katie and I put up all the money; and we still see dividends that come in profit. That’s more than you would make on those kinds of movies, but we put up no salary at the front. We risk the movie, we risk our efforts, but that’s how you get cool stuff made. I’m willing to have some errors, too. I haven’t lost money yet, but I’m sure I will at some point.

Multi-Tasker Mark Duplass Explains His New Indie Paradigm

by Anne Thompson

What are the projects you’re working on now?

“The One I Love” is coming out August 22nd. “Creep,” which I just finished and sold — also to Radius — we’re going to do a trilogy of those movies. I’m going to make two more towards the end of year. My new show  “Togetherness” will come out on HBO in January. This is the time when you start submitting your movies to Toronto and Sundance, so I have five others that I’m producing and working on, and I have two television shows I’m making independently. I’m very interested in taking the model of independent film directly into television, which it’s time for. Rather than just go out and say, “Hey, here’s my script and pilot,” and then they just cancel you — because that’s what they do — I’m trying to cut through all that and just say, “Here is a season of a television show. If you like it, you have to buy this and buy one more.” So I can guarantee being on the air.

So you’ll pay for that in advance, then shoot it. Wow. Netflix might give you the money?

Yeah. They might, but…I know it sounds crazy, but I’d rather gamble on myself. The money I have to make by owning myself and the control I have over the content is worthwhile to me, rather than getting an upfront price tag, having our salaries be low, and we feel like we should be grateful because… I don’t want to do that any more.

Is “Jeff, Who Lives at Home” an example of where you felt slightly compromised on what you ended up doing?

[Jay and I] did pretty well on “Jeff,” actually, because that was independently financed by Steve Rales, who runs Indian Paintbrush. But [on others] there was a bit of a battle. Ultimately, I’ve almost gotten to make what I want to make; it’s just a question of how much yelling you have to do to get there, and an unfortunate reality of this town is they often don’t think you’re passionate unless you’re screaming. I like to be a sensitive person. I’ve been to therapy; I know that you need to validate people and listen to them, hear them. I’m in a marriage and I know all about this stuff. When you do that in a studio meeting, they think you’re weak and walk all over you. When you yell, it’s “this guy has vision and passion!” Which sucks! But I’ve been put in that position. Sometimes you have to do that.

But you don’t have to do that with Lynn Shelton. Or Colin Trevorrow on “Safety Not Guaranteed,” another example where you collaborated with a young director. Who has gone on to “Jurassic Park”!

I work with really smart first-time directors. I think, “you’re like what I thought when I was 28. You’re full of these ideas, you’re a cool person, and you don’t know how to put yourself on film yet.” The first thing I ask them is, “What was the last conversation you had where you knew you had to go to sleep for work the next day, but you couldn’t go to sleep because you were so excited — you were up with your friends drinking wine? Something in the content of that conversation is what you should be making your movie about.”

It took me ten years to figure that out. When my brother and I would sit on an airplane and watch the crazy people coming on the airplane and tell weird little stories about them — people-watch in our private little sense of humor — that’s where your stuff comes from. I feel like, as a producer, I have something like that to offer: eliciting stuff out of people.

In an ideal world you would be moving up in the movie business, but you’re still working at a micro-budget level. Is there an opportunity for you to grow and make a living?

I’ll be perfectly honest with you: the way I work on a micro-budget makes me more money and makes me more creatively satisfied than if I was doing movies at a 4-to-$7-million level. It sounds crazy, but I now have the connections in the industry so that I can borrow cameras and I can borrow locations. Everybody comes to work for [a small flat rate] per day — whether you’re a PA or a director, whoever you are. It’s all Communism. But you get points, and everybody’s an owner in the movie.

Which movies follow this model?

Quite a few of them. “Creep” is a great example of that; “The One I Love” is a good example of that. “Your Sister’s Sister,” “Baghead,” “Pentathlon” — the list goes on and on. I take money from my TV shows and I do everything. What I do is, I don’t hog 80% of the profits like a studio would, because everybody’s doing the work, so I share a huge chunk of the movie with my cast and crew — anywhere from 50 to 80% of it, depending on how complex it is. We take that movie, we sell it, and I make sure the distributors get a piece of it, because I don’t beat up my distributors. If it’s going to be profitable, you owe me some of that. When you break down the finances… when you go from a $5 million movie, you make $30,000, maybe, and you get no points. But when I make these little movies and we sell them, people walk away with windfalls. You’d be surprised.

Something like “Black Rock” was a movie that we made for [a tiny budget and sold for much more than that]; I shared that with all my cast and crew; Katie and I put up all the money; and we still see dividends that come in profit. That’s more than you would make on those kinds of movies, but we put up no salary at the front. We risk the movie, we risk our efforts, but that’s how you get cool stuff made. I’m willing to have some errors, too. I haven’t lost money yet, but I’m sure I will at some point.

thecinenotes

Cinema is a specificity of vision. It’s an approach in which everything matters. It’s the polar opposite of generic or arbitrary and the result is as unique as a signature or a fingerprint. It isn’t made by a committee, and it isn’t made by a company, and it isn’t made by the audience. It means that if this filmmaker didn’t do it, it either wouldn’t exist at all, or it wouldn’t exist in anything like this form.
Steven Soderbergh

Cinema is a specificity of vision. It’s an approach in which everything matters. It’s the polar opposite of generic or arbitrary and the result is as unique as a signature or a fingerprint. It isn’t made by a committee, and it isn’t made by a company, and it isn’t made by the audience. It means that if this filmmaker didn’t do it, it either wouldn’t exist at all, or it wouldn’t exist in anything like this form.

Steven Soderbergh

When I was a kid, there was no collaboration; it’s you with a camera bossing your friends around. But as an adult, filmmaking is all about appreciating the talents of the people you surround yourself with and knowing you could never have made any of these films by yourself.Steven Spielberg
When I was a kid, there was no collaboration; it’s you with a camera bossing your friends around. But as an adult, filmmaking is all about appreciating the talents of the people you surround yourself with and knowing you could never have made any of these films by yourself.
losetheboyfriend
losetheboyfriend:

Steven Spielberg; captured by Ulvis Alberts (1976)

Went to see Jaws at Central Cinema the other weekend. The amazing nutritional yeast popcorn, watching the film with a fun screaming crowd, going with someone who hadn’t seen it before — super awesome.
I’ll admit, I like the movie but I was never a rabid fan. But that experience was fantastic. Not just the ambiance, but a new perspective — while others are going to see the newest CGI tentpole I was watching a 39 year old movie that was more original, artistic, progressive, and exciting.
What stuck out to me the most was all the things you just don’t see in movies any more. The steady shots. Wide shots. The slow burn. Adults doing adult jobs. Setups and payoffs for an audience with an attention span. Not to mention the fantastic Spielberg Oner.
At the end of the film everyone clapped and one person called out “Now that’s a movie!”

losetheboyfriend:

Steven Spielberg; captured by Ulvis Alberts (1976)

Went to see Jaws at Central Cinema the other weekend. The amazing nutritional yeast popcorn, watching the film with a fun screaming crowd, going with someone who hadn’t seen it before — super awesome.

I’ll admit, I like the movie but I was never a rabid fan. But that experience was fantastic. Not just the ambiance, but a new perspective — while others are going to see the newest CGI tentpole I was watching a 39 year old movie that was more original, artistic, progressive, and exciting.

What stuck out to me the most was all the things you just don’t see in movies any more. The steady shots. Wide shots. The slow burn. Adults doing adult jobs. Setups and payoffs for an audience with an attention span. Not to mention the fantastic Spielberg Oner.

At the end of the film everyone clapped and one person called out “Now that’s a movie!”