The story is really satisfying because it comes from patterns that we are born with, that our culture is founded upon. There are structures, just as there are structures in our language that underlie, that are built into all of us. Artists don’t invent, they discover. They give you something that resonates with something that’s inside you and the closer they get to the real deal, the real stuff the gut-level stuff, the longer it’s going to last because it remains satisfying beyond fashion. Beyond period.

Jackson De Govia Production Designer from the Die Hard commentary

He goes on to say:

Die Hard is not unique in that it doesn’t date. Fred Astaire doesn’t date. John Ford doesn’t date. In time this is going to look like a wonderful period movie. Like those films that we loved that we all grew up watching on TV. Because it’s not only of it’s time, it’s beyond it’s time. It’s in deep time. That same old story that’s going on that we all share.”

My notion is that a lot of times what’s expressive in words is the sound of the words rather than the specific meaning of them. This is ridiculous, you don’t want to know anything about all this — but there’s this shrink who’s done all this work with autistic children and it’s a guy who’s given up shrinkdom and is a marketing maven for a lot of large corporations, making million dollars a year telling corporations what people really mean by particular phrases or what they actually thing about some something — and he’s done all this work with autistic children and he’s found that the reason they don’t speak isn’t because they don’t have the mechanism to speak it’s because their emotional equipment is fucked up and consequently they have no reason to speak because speech is first of all not code of meaning, not a way to communicate to others, it is purely a way to translate emotion into noise. And if you have no reason to express emotion as noise you won’t speak. That’s what it is first.

I grew up watching foreign movies, studying foreign movies, and I never bothered to read the subtitles. Often if I saw the movie a second time and did read the subtitles, or certainly if I heard a dubbed film, the movie would fall flat. It was far better when the words were just an expression, were like movie score.

John McTiernan from the Die Hard commentary
rubenfm
cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From… It’s powerful knowledge — straight from the source.
Martin Scorsese
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Billy Wilder
Steven Spielberg
The Coen Brothers
Wes Anderson
Ridley Scott
David Cronenberg
Pixar
Nora Ephron
Aaron Sorkin
Michael Haneke
Christopher Nolan
Jon Jost
John Ford
Charlie Kaufman
Sylvester Stallone
Tony Scott
Frank Darabont
Monty Python
Werner Herzog
Paul Thomas Anderson

Joss Whedon
Rian Johnson
Wes Craven
John Carpenter
Dario Argento
The Wachowskis
Steven Soderbergh
George Lucas
Peter Jackson
Kathryn Bigelow
Quentin Tarantino
Sundance Directors
Harold Lloyd
John McTiernan
Oscar Winning Directors
Ang Lee
Danny Boyle
Harmony Korine
Dennis Hopper
Sam Raimi
Shane Black
Richard Linklater
Alejandro Jodorowsky
Guillermo del Toro
Sam Peckinpah
Akira Kurosawa

Edgar Wright
Wong Kar-Wai
Robert Altman
James Wan
Errol Morris
Ron Howard
Yasujirō Ozu
Kimberly Peirce
Steve McQueen
Andy Warhol
Roger Deakins
David O. Russell
James Gray
Terry Gilliam
Andy Serkis
Rick Baker
Alain Resnais
William Friedkin
Saul Zaentz
Woody Allen’s Manhattan
Abbas Kiarostami
Darren Aronofsky
Lars von Trier
Hayao Miyazaki
Federico Fellini
Sarah Polley
Tommy Wiseau
Brian Koppelman
Spike Lee

cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From… It’s powerful knowledge — straight from the source.