I began writing scripts with two other people around 1940. Up until then I wrote alone, and found that I had no difficulties. But in writing alone there is a danger that your interpretation of another human being will suffer from one-sidedness. If you write with two other people about that human being, you get at least three different viewpoints on him, and you can discuss the points on which you disagree. Also, the director has a natural tendency to nudge the hero and the plot along into a pattern that is the easiest one for him to direct. By writing with about two other people, you can avoid this danger also.

Akira Kurosawa

I wish this were a more common, accepted practice.

fuckyeahdirectors

In Hollywood, more often than not, they’re making more kind of traditional films, stories that are understood by people. And the entire story is understood. And they become worried if even for one small moment something happens that is not understood by everyone. But what’s so fantastic is to get down into areas where things are abstract and where things are felt, or understood in an intuitive way that, you can’t, you know, put a microphone to somebody at the theatre and say ‘Did you understand that?’ but they come out with a strange, fantastic feeling and they can carry that, and it opens some little door or something that’s magical and that’s the power that film has. -David Lynch

In Hollywood, more often than not, they’re making more kind of traditional films, stories that are understood by people. And the entire story is understood. And they become worried if even for one small moment something happens that is not understood by everyone. But what’s so fantastic is to get down into areas where things are abstract and where things are felt, or understood in an intuitive way that, you can’t, you know, put a microphone to somebody at the theatre and say ‘Did you understand that?’ but they come out with a strange, fantastic feeling and they can carry that, and it opens some little door or something that’s magical and that’s the power that film has. -David Lynch

creativesomething
What people who don’t write don’t understand is that they think you make up the line consciously, but you don’t. It proceeds from your unconscious. So it’s the same surprise to you [as it is to me]. I don’t think of the joke and then say it. I say it and then realize what I’ve said. And I laugh at it, because I’m hearing it for the first time myself.
Insights on life, work, and creativity from the ever great Woody Allen (via creativesomething)
thefilmfatale

Anonymous asked:

I was watching Before Midnight once more, and I was struck by that long take at the beginning. I was wondering - why is that filming technique employed in some movies? To give them more realism? I did find it more immersive, though, like I was a part of that scene somehow along with them. I'd love to hear your thoughs! And thanks. :)

thefilmfatale answered:

Yeah, I think you hit it on the head there when you say that the long take has to do with realism. Constructing the world in a movie is largely the job of editing. It’s how the audience pieces things together and comprehends the mise en scène. I’ll use The Place Beyond the Pines director Derek Cianfrance’s quote to better illustrate the point: “We wanted to shoot a lot of film in these long takes. I feel once you cut, there’s a security and safety in a cut. There’s a lie in a cut. It you don’t cut, there’s a truthfulness to it” (x). It’s like when Kim Jee-Woon decided not to cut during the gruesome takes in I Saw the Devil. The effect becomes unsettling because the continuity temporarily shatters the audience’s suspension of disbelief. Editing (cutting, transitioning, etc) makes up so much of film that when a long take is employed it gives the illusion of reality. Also see: Alfonso Cuaròn’s notoriously long takes in Children of Men and Gravity.

theacademy
theacademy:

When Paramount refused to fund Hitchcock’s 1960 film, the Master of Suspense bankrolled it himself for just $800k. The result was a financial and artistic success that accounted for more than $60 million in box office receipts. “Psycho” was so popular it was re-released five years later and remains one of his most popular films. A fine example of putting your money where your… shower curtain is.

theacademy:

When Paramount refused to fund Hitchcock’s 1960 film, the Master of Suspense bankrolled it himself for just $800k. The result was a financial and artistic success that accounted for more than $60 million in box office receipts. “Psycho” was so popular it was re-released five years later and remains one of his most popular films. A fine example of putting your money where your… shower curtain is.

cinephilearchive
cinephilearchive:

Here is a great selection of audio commentaries from YouTube. Better than film school. Seriously, this should be required listening for filmmakers and cinephiles, screenwriters and storytellers, movie buffs and film aficionados. “Seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”
‘Raging Bull’ audio commentary with Martin Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker
‘Point Blank’ audio commentary with John Boorman and Steven Soderbergh
‘The Third Man’ audio commentary with Steven Soderbergh and Tony Gilroy
‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf’ audio commentary with Mike Nichols and Steven Soderbergh
‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf’ audio commentary with Haskell Wexler
‘The Devils’ audio commentary with Ken Russell, Mark Kermode, Michael Bradsell and Paul Joyce
‘Casino’ audio commentary with Martin Scorsese, Nicholas Pileggi, Thelma Schoonmaker, Barbara De Fina, Sharon Stone and Rita Ryack
‘Gangs of New York’ audio commentary with Martin Scorsese
‘The Limey’ audio commentary with Steven Soderbergh and Lem Dobbs
‘Schizopolis’ audio commentary with Steven Soderbergh

‘True Romance’ audio commentary with Quentin Tarantino
‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’ audio commentary with Hunter S. Thompson
‘Fight Club’ audio commentary with David Fincher and cast
‘Reservoir Dogs’ audio commentary with Quentin Tarantino, Lawrence Bender, Monte Hellman, Andrzej Sekula, Sally Menke, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen and Kirk Baltz
‘Mean Streets’ audio commentary with Martin Scorsese and Amy Robinson
‘Apocalypse Now’ audio commentary with Francis Ford Coppola
‘Salvador’ audio commentary with Oliver Stone
‘A History of Violence’ audio commentary with David Cronenberg
‘Thief’ audio commentary with Michael Mann and James Caan
‘The French Connection’ audio commentary with William Friedkin

‘Se7en’ audio commentary with David Fincher and cast
‘Hard Eight’ audio commentary with Paul Thomas Anderson and Philip Baker Hall
‘A Fistful of Dollars’ audio commentary with Christopher Frayling
‘Following’ audio commentary with Christopher Nolan
‘Taxi Driver’ audio commentary with Martin Scorsese and Paul Schrader
‘Once Upon a Time in America’ audio commentary with Richard Schickel
‘Wall Street’ audio commentary with Oliver Stone
‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ audio commentary with Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood

‘Zodiac’ audio commentary with David Fincher
‘Panic Room’ audio commentary with David Fincher
‘The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’ audio commentary with David Fincher
‘Collateral’ audio commentary with Michael Mann
‘The Godfather’ audio commentary with Francis Ford Coppola
‘Traffic’ audio commentary with Steven Soderbergh and Stephen Gaghan
‘Sex, Lies and Videotape’ audio commentary with Steven Soderbergh and Neil LaBute

cinephilearchive:

Here is a great selection of audio commentaries from YouTube. Better than film school. Seriously, this should be required listening for filmmakers and cinephiles, screenwriters and storytellers, movie buffs and film aficionados. “Seize the day boys, make your lives extraordinary.”