losetheboyfriend
losetheboyfriend:

Steven Spielberg; captured by Ulvis Alberts (1976)

Went to see Jaws at Central Cinema the other weekend. The amazing nutritional yeast popcorn, watching the film with a fun screaming crowd, going with someone who hadn’t seen it before — super awesome.
I’ll admit, I like the movie but I was never a rabid fan. But that experience was fantastic. Not just the ambiance, but a new perspective — while others are going to see the newest CGI tentpole I was watching a 39 year old movie that was more original, artistic, progressive, and exciting.
What stuck out to me the most was all the things you just don’t see in movies any more. The steady shots. Wide shots. The slow burn. Adults doing adult jobs. Setups and payoffs for an audience with an attention span. Not to mention the fantastic Spielberg Oner.
At the end of the film everyone clapped and one person called out “Now that’s a movie!”

losetheboyfriend:

Steven Spielberg; captured by Ulvis Alberts (1976)

Went to see Jaws at Central Cinema the other weekend. The amazing nutritional yeast popcorn, watching the film with a fun screaming crowd, going with someone who hadn’t seen it before — super awesome.

I’ll admit, I like the movie but I was never a rabid fan. But that experience was fantastic. Not just the ambiance, but a new perspective — while others are going to see the newest CGI tentpole I was watching a 39 year old movie that was more original, artistic, progressive, and exciting.

What stuck out to me the most was all the things you just don’t see in movies any more. The steady shots. Wide shots. The slow burn. Adults doing adult jobs. Setups and payoffs for an audience with an attention span. Not to mention the fantastic Spielberg Oner.

At the end of the film everyone clapped and one person called out “Now that’s a movie!”

rudolphvalentinos

"as you grow older, you will discover you have two hands, one for helping yourself, the other for helping others”

4.5.1929-happy birthday audrey

I chose this as my Audrey post because it doesn’t just show Hepburn the actress, this is the person.

It’s a reminder. There is more to life than what we do — in every avenue, who we are is what matters.

theacademy
theacademy:

When Paramount refused to fund Hitchcock’s 1960 film, the Master of Suspense bankrolled it himself for just $800k. The result was a financial and artistic success that accounted for more than $60 million in box office receipts. “Psycho” was so popular it was re-released five years later and remains one of his most popular films. A fine example of putting your money where your… shower curtain is.

theacademy:

When Paramount refused to fund Hitchcock’s 1960 film, the Master of Suspense bankrolled it himself for just $800k. The result was a financial and artistic success that accounted for more than $60 million in box office receipts. “Psycho” was so popular it was re-released five years later and remains one of his most popular films. A fine example of putting your money where your… shower curtain is.

mattybing1025
mattybing1025:

Old Hollywood Stars That Served In The United States Military   |  Clark Gable
After his wife Carole Lombard died in a plane crash returning from a War Bond drive, a grief-stricken Gable joined the US Army Air Force and was off the screen for three years, flying combat missions in Europe.  He served as a Captain making training films. Also trained as an aerial gunner, he flew 5 combat missions with the 8th Air Force’s 351st Bombardment Group (Heavy) while making his films and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal.   Adolf Hitler esteemed the film star above all other actors, and during the war offered a sizable reward to anyone who could capture and return Gable, who was flying combat missions over Germany, unscathed to him.

mattybing1025:

Old Hollywood Stars That Served In The United States Military   |  Clark Gable

After his wife Carole Lombard died in a plane crash returning from a War Bond drive, a grief-stricken Gable joined the US Army Air Force and was off the screen for three years, flying combat missions in Europe.  He served as a Captain making training films. Also trained as an aerial gunner, he flew 5 combat missions with the 8th Air Force’s 351st Bombardment Group (Heavy) while making his films and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal.   Adolf Hitler esteemed the film star above all other actors, and during the war offered a sizable reward to anyone who could capture and return Gable, who was flying combat missions over Germany, unscathed to him.